Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife Download È 8

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Heaven and Hell A History of the AfterlifeA New York Times bestselling historian of Hell A Epub #218 early Christianity takes on two of the most gripping uestions of Heaven and eBook #222 human existence where did the ideas of heaven and hell come from and why do they endureWhat happens when and Hell A PDFEPUB #196 we die A recent Pew Research poll showed that % of Americans believe in a literal heaven % in and Hell A History of PDFEPUB or a literal hell Most people who hold these beliefs are Christian and assume they are the age old teachings of the Bible But eternal rewards and punishments are found nowhere in the Old Testament and are not what Jesus or his disciples taught So where did the ideas come from In clear and compelling terms Bart Ehrman recounts the long history of the afterlife ranging from The Epic of Gilgamesh up to the writings of Augustine focusing especially on the teachings of Jesus and his early followers He discusses ancient guided tours of heaven and hell in which a living person observes the sublime blessings of heaven for those who are saved and the horrifying torments of hell for the damned Some of these accounts take the form of near death experiences the oldest on record with intriguing similarities to those reported today One of Ehrmans startling conclusions is that there never was a single Greek Jewish or Christian understanding of the afterlife but numerous competing views Moreover these views did not come from nowhere they were intimately connected with the social cultural and historical worlds out of which they emerged Only and Hell A History of PDFEPUB or later in the early Christian centuries did they develop into the notions of eternal bliss or damnation widely accepted today As a historian Ehrman obviously cannot provide a definitive answer to the uestion of what happens after death In Heaven and Hell he does the next best thing by helping us reflect on where our ideas of the afterlife come from he assures us that eve. This is the latest in Bart Ehrman's fine series of books examining the early history of Christianity Ehrman is a Professor of Religious Studies and one of the best known writers in the field Although his books are aimed at a general rather than specialist audience there is no lack of scholarly rigorAs Ehrman relates it ideas about the afterlife among Jews and Christians in the last centuries BC and in the first century AD varied widely and were heavily influenced by borrowings from other cultures including Persian Zoroastrianism and especially Greek philosophy It is important when reading texts from what are now known as the Old and New Testaments to understand what the people who were active when those texts were written would have understood them to mean Often this varies considerably from how they are usually interpreted in the present day Ehrman presents a wealth of fascinating details about among many other things how the concepts of eternal bliss and eternal punishment developed slowly and in response to issues and challenges faced by the people who were developing themBy the end of Heaven and Hell some of Ehrman's readers may feel a sense of unease because what they've just read disagrees with what they have heard in worship services for many years That's perfectly acceptable I've never believed that anyone's faith can be challenged unless they want it to be and I believe that anyone who reads this and other works by Ehrman with open minds can feel comfortable rather than less with their new knowledge

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N we die there is certainly nothing to fearA New York Times bestselling historian of early Christianity takes on two of the most gripping uestions of human existence where did the ideas of heaven and hell come from and why do they endureWhat happens when we die A recent Pew Research poll showed that % of Americans believe in a literal heaven % in a literal hell Most people who hold these beliefs are Christian and assume they are the age old teachings of the Bible But eternal rewards and punishments are found nowhere in the Old Testament and are not what Jesus or his disciples taught So where did the ideas come from In clear and compelling terms Bart Ehrman recounts the long history of the afterlife ranging from The Epic of Gilgamesh up to the writings of Augustine focusing especially on the teachings of Jesus and his early followers He discusses ancient guided tours of heaven and hell in which a living person observes the sublime blessings of heaven for those who are saved and the horrifying torments of hell for the damned Some of these accounts take the form of near death experiences the oldest on record with intriguing similarities to those reported today One of Ehrmans startling conclusions is that there never was a single Greek Jewish or Christian understanding of the afterlife but numerous competing views Moreover these views did not come from nowhere they were intimately connected with the social cultural and historical worlds out of which they emerged Only later in the early Christian centuries did they develop into the notions of eternal bliss or damnation widely accepted today As a historian Ehrman obviously cannot provide a definitive answer to the uestion of what happens after death In Heaven and Hell he does the next best thing by helping us reflect on where our ideas of the afterlife come from he assures us that even if there may be something to hope for when we die there is certainly nothing to fear. Excellent book by Bart Ehrman It covers some interesting uestions but I don't agree with all of the statements that he makes and found the odd subject like Zoroastrianism far too briefly mentioned and far too easily dismissed where as it needed a much in depth discussion But all in all an enjoyable read that I would recommend

Review Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife

Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife Download È 8 ¸ [PDF / Epub] ☆ Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife By Join or create book clubs – Danpashley.co.uk A New York Times bestselling historian of early Christianity takes on two of the most gripping uestions of human existence where did the ideas of heN if there may be something to hope for when we die there is certainly nothing to fearA New York Times bestselling historian of early Christianity takes on two of the most gripping uestions of human existence where did the ideas of heaven and hell come from and why do they endureWhat happens when we die A recent Pew Research poll showed that % of Americans believe in a literal heaven % in a literal hell Most people who hold these beliefs are Christian and assume they are the age old teachings of the Bible But eternal rewards and punishments are found nowhere in the Old Testament and are not what Jesus or his disciples taught So where did the ideas come from In clear and compelling terms Bart Ehrman recounts the long history of the afterlife ranging from The Epic of Gilgamesh up to the writings of Augustine focusing especially on the teachings of Jesus and his early followers He discusses ancient guided tours of heaven and hell in which a living person observes the sublime blessings of heaven for those who are saved and the horrifying torments of hell for the damned Some of these accounts take the form of near death experiences the oldest on record with intriguing similarities to those reported today One of Ehrmans startling conclusions is that there never was a single Greek Jewish or Christian understanding of the afterlife but numerous competing views Moreover these views did not come from nowhere they were intimately connected with the social cultural and historical worlds out of which they emerged Only later in the early Christian centuries did they develop into the notions of eternal bliss or damnation widely accepted today As a historian Ehrman obviously cannot provide a definitive answer to the uestion of what happens after death In Heaven and Hell he does the next best thing by helping us reflect on where our ideas of the afterlife come from he assures us that even if there may be something to hope for whe. This is a short readable account of how biblical ‘ideas’ of hell were part of broad intellectual trends common across various Akkadian Greek Roman Israelite and Christian sources His main point is actually about how these classical ideas did not involve any idea of hell as infinite torture The publishers must have re titled the book I'm not even sure heaven is mentioned It’s a bit of a traditional cultural and intellectual history but in an informal and reader friendly way If you’re interested in this topic you will enjoy and appreciate itThe main thing to know up front is that Ehrman is a textual critic When studying ideas he doesn't want to reason or interpret leaving the text behind but to stick with the text and to read the words closely because ideas come in the form of verbal statements He has a lawyer like sense of precision about what statements actually say and and don't say So expect his uestion about whether fiery torment is a biblical thing or not to be answered through a gathering and reading of relevant texts ie specific statements interpreted against a broad background of possible meaningsThe textual critic's main assumption is that humans invent ideas and so each idea gets a kind of intellectual date stamp As ideas circulate ideas they get misinterpreted or develop and new meanings cluster around the original ones So when we read old material we must respect the actual original context of an idea to avoid misreading it in the light of those later ideas As Christian ideas are the focus here Ehrman is consciously trying to avoid reading biblical sources in the light of later theological ideas a familiar Protestant exercise So he is apt to write things like ‘We must avoid coming to this passage with later Christian theology in mind’ as in ch5 when he shows how to read Ezekiel 377 8 as a story about national recovery not about personal resurrectionHis book's big claim is that the our familiar ideas of the afterlife were synthesised from a broader cultural tradition and then slowly elaborated by the Paul Luke John mainly into a Christian theology He concludes that we are wrong to read a clear and stable theology into the Bible He denies Jesus had thoughts about a Hell of eternal bodily suffering – in other words the Bible is not ‘theological’There’s 3 main parts to this as he tracks beliefs about the afterlife in 3 broad historical eras1 Bible ideas were part of general culture and should be approached historically Early ideas about the afterlife in Homer for example imagined it as just another place but with a ghostly kind of semi existence The Old Testament drew from the same general set of cultural ideas and attached little importance to the afterlife With the Roman uptake of Greek ideas lots of people saw fear of death as a possible spur to behave better Now the afterlife became important specifically as a spur to better behaviour in the present Again the New Testament drew upon these general cultural assumptions So uite a lot of the New Testament ideas about the afterlife are of this kind2 The Bible's ideas about the afterlife are simple In the Old Testament death is mainly flagged as unthinkable; sometimes death and subseuent resurrection is used to describe Israel’s destiny In the New Testament death is linked to some basic ideas about punishments and rewards for individuals not nations but only as a way of urging moral restraint in the present In addition there are some apocalyptic ideas in the Old Testament and New Testament the view that although 'we' are on the losing side now 'you' should be aware that justice is about to be meted out These ideas were strongly expressed during the Maccabees Revolt around 167BC None of these are clear about the afterlife and there are no fiery torments for the bad They are mainly about drawing