MOBI Õ DOC The ueen of the Ring Diamonds and the Making of an American Legend FREE ✓ DANPASHLEY

TEXT Í Õ Jeff Leen

The story of Mildred Burke the longest reigning champion of female wrestling from the Pulitzer Prizewinning journalist and author of Kings of Cocaine In this in depth account journalist Jeff Leen pulls back the curtain on a forgotten era when a petite midwesterner used her beauty and brawn to dominate Americas most masculine sport At only five feet two Mildred Burke was an unlikely candidate for the ring A waitress barely scraping by on Depression era tips she saw her way out when she attended her first wrestling match When women were still struggling for euality with men Burke regularly foughtand beatmale wrestlers Rippling with muscle and dripping with diamonds she walked the fine line between pin up beauty and hardened brawler An unforgettable slice of Americana The ueen of the Ringcaptures the golden age of wrestling when one gritty glamorous woman rose through the ranks to take her place in athletic history Jeff Leen has made a fabulous contribution to the sports history canon The ueen of the Ring is a marvelous evocation of an era and a riveting portrait of a one of a kind American moll Sally Jenkins author of The Real All Americans 女子プロレスの草分けのような人について書かれた作品だったので手に入れられてよかったと思います。

PDF The Queen of the Ring

The Queen of the Ring Sex Muscles Diamonds and the Making of an American LegendThe story of Mildred Burke the longest reigning champion of female wrestling from the Pulitzer Prizewinning journalist and author of Kings of Cocaine In this in depth account journalist Jeff Leen pulls back the curtain on a forgotten era when a petite midwesterner used her beauty and brawn to dominate Americas most masculine sport At only five feet two Mildred Burke was an unlikely candidate for the ring A waitress barely scraping by on Depression era tips she saw her way out when she attended her first wrestling match When women were still struggling for euality with men Burke regularly foughtand beatmale wrestlers Rippling with muscle and dripping with diamonds she walked the fine line between pin up beauty and hardened brawler An unforgettable slice of Americana The ueen of the Ringcaptures the golden age of wrestling when one gritty glamorous woman rose through the ranks to take her place in athletic history Jeff Leen has made a fabulous contribution to the sports history canon The ueen of the Ring is a marvelous evocation of an era and a riveting portrait of a one of a kind American moll Sally Jenkins author of The Real All Americans Last month when the WWE announced it was going to name its first ever women’s battle royal to be held at this year’s Wrestlemania after the Fabulous Moolah the wrestling sector of the Internet collectively threw up While Vince McMahon’s family empire has tried for years to cast the late Lillian Ellison as a pioneering proto feminist kicking down doors in the boys’ club of professional wrestling too many people nowadays know the truth she was among other things a pimp a bigot and a non existent draw who held back US women’s wrestling for decadesBut the shame is there really is a woman who did all the things the WWE attributes to Moolah but she’s been almost totally forgotten even by the history savvy wrestling fans who successfully cowed McMahon into changing the name of his battle royalMildred Burke born Mildred Bliss was during her heyday in the late 1940s a genuine star of the burgeoning television era a woman wrestler who outdrew most men and usually headlined over them as well In contrast to Moolah whose matches consisted primarily of hair pulling Burke was a legitimate “shooter” able to apply genuinely painful wrestling holds if she had to a skill she picked up as a teenaged mother working in the Midwestern carnival circuit Dripping in diamonds hobnobbing with Hollywood stars being greeted by the President of Cuba on a tour of that country she did all that in the midst of a climate of fierce opposition to women wrestling at all women were banned from rings in New York and California and Burke was held up as an example of degradation by everyone from Christian pastors to Earl Warren to Nazi propagandistsFrom that height Burke would in just a few years from her peak be right back to where she was before she got into wrestling serving her mother’s chili as a waitress in a small dinerThe story of that rise and fall is largely a story of her relationship with one man Billy Wolfe who rose from being a midcard heel wrestler working the Midwest in the 1920s to the person responsible for essentially every women’s wrestling match in the country during the boom period that followed World War II As Jeff Leen investigative editor for the Washington Post who seems to have read every contemporary newspaper article ever penned about Burke and ably handles her story makes clear Wolfe was among the sleaziest human beings in the history of professional wrestling an astonishingly unpleasant distinction to have He was abusive cruel and unfaithful from the beginning and once the two of them began to have success for despite his shortcomings as a human being Wolfe had a true genius for promotion their marriage essentially became a business partnership marked by mutual loathing The low point came when Burke after years on top of the business refused to put over Wolfe’s new chosen wrestler and in response he and his son from another marriage who had become Burke’s lover beat her senseless in the parking lot of a liuor storeWhen Burke and Wolfe split it was the end of her reign and practically the end of women’s wrestling in the United States By that point the business was controlled by the promoters’ cartel called the National Wrestling Alliance which was able to strangle any competition this worked in Burke’s favor when she was Wolfe’s champion and very much against her when she was notThe dispute between them came down to that rarest of things a shoot match booked into Atlanta Burke wrestled June Byers for the women’s world championship It’s one of the most famous matches of the century among wrestling historians both because of its non worked nature and because of the outcome Byers won the first fall but in an era when title matches were always decided in a two of three falls match the referee stopped the bout before a second fall had occurred throwing the championship into doubt forever The NWA stepped in to head off the intensely negative publicity and in the process decided to put a two year moratorium on women’s wrestling altogetherAs Leen makes clear the NWA never had any interest in supporting a woman over a man even a man like Wolfe who most of the promoters regarded as little than a pimp Sam Muchnick the St Louis promoter who ruled the NWA during its glory years with a stuffy propriety is revealed by Leen as another callow misogynist sniffing that This is a man’s organization” and that women had no place in it a view shared by his champion Lou Thesz who refused to wrestle on cards that also featured womenThe NWA settled the dispute between Wolfe and Burke by arranging Burke’s buyout of her ex husband’s booking business that was from start to finish a double cross the men who fronted the money for the deal were lawyers who worked for Wolfe and with legal ethics that Roy Cohn might envy almost immediately called in their loans bankrupting BurkeUnable to work in the US Burke toured Japan in 1954 where she had a phenomenally successful run that led to the creation of multiple Japanese women’s promotions that eventually merged into All Japan Women’s Pro Wrestling whose world and tag team titles were created by Burke AJW would go on to set a standard for both popularity and overall uality in women’s wrestling that to this day has never been surpassedBurke never got to enjoy that success much the NWA’s Honolulu office complained about her presence in Japan effectively blackballing her from the country She worked a variety of odd jobs in southern California supported by her son who made good in the booming defense industry there By the early 1970s she was pioneering something else in women’s wrestling “custom matches” shot on film in small rooms and purchased by individual customers In the beginning these were nothing than wrestling matches but later under the company name Star Films they essentially became softcore porn with topless matches bikini matches and the beginnings of what would become “apartment wrestling”Burke was deeply if understandably embittered by her experiences and if there’s any major fault with Leen’s book is that he sometimes takes her unpublished memoirs too much at face value Wrestling was particularly in those days a business that relied on sleight of hand and suspension of disbelief and Burke’s autobiography was apparently full exaggerations distortions and plain falsehoods Remembering her shoot with June Byers as a major triumph before an enraptured crowd Burke is at odds with literally every other account of that night which have the referee stopping the match because after an hour the crowd was bored and starting to leave Shoot matches as it happens just aren’t all that fun to watchVery few people come off well in this book Burke herself is vengeful and paranoid at the height of her fame believing every bump in the ring was a trick by Wolfe to double cross her and take her title; Wolfe is unimaginably repugnant; her lover Wolfe’s son is a rum sodden weakling who eventually knuckles under to his father’s brutality and betrays Burke; the entire wrestling industry is run by crooks either hypocrites like Muchnick or soiled eccentrics like Jack Pfefer who manages to get women’s matches in northern New Jersey the attention of the New York City press while privately calling women wrestlers “lower than dogs” Among her wrestling peers only Oklahoma promoter Leroy McGuirk who gave Jim Ross his start in wrestling and Gorgeous George come off well The former fought for Burke against his NWA peers while the latter “one of God’s noblemen” in Burke’s phrase came up to her in a dressing room at the nadir of her money troubles and pressed an envelope with 5000 in cash the euivalent of about 47000 today into her hand “There” he said “Take that and beat that son of a bitch” meaning WolfeBurke did not beat Wolfe although the nastiness of his feud with her and the general downturn in the wrestling business from the mid 1950s laid him low He died of a heart attack in 1963 at the age of 66 shortly after his seventh and final marriage to a 17 year old His son Burke’s ex lover who had left the wrestling business died a year laterBurke outlived them by decades but shut out of the wrestling business which was controlled by Moolah for decades she never got the credit she was due Hopefully today in what is honestly a golden age for women’s wrestling in the United States that will change and Mildred Burke will be recognized as the pioneer and champion she was Leen’s book is the best place to start with restoring her to prominence

Jeff Leen Õ TEXT

MOBI Õ DOC The Queen of the Ring Diamonds and the Making of an American Legend FREE ✓ DANPASHLEY × [PDF / Epub] ☉ The Queen of the Ring: Sex, Muscles, Diamonds, and the Making of an American Legend By Jeff Leen – Danpashley.co.uk The story of Mildred Burke tThe story of Mildred Burke the longest reigning champion of female wrestling from the Pulitzer Prizewinning journalist and author of Kings of Cocaine In this in depth account journalist Jeff Leen pulls back the curtain on a forgotten era when a petite midwesterner used her beauty and brawn to dominate Americas most masculine sport At only five feet two Mildred Burke was an unlikely candidate for the ring A waitress barely scraping by on Depression era tips she saw her way out when she attended her first wrestling match When women were still struggling for euality with men Burke regularly foughtand beatmale wrestlers Rippling with muscle and dripping with diamonds she walked the fine line between pin up beauty and hardened brawler An unforgettable slice of Americana The ueen of the Ringcaptures the golden age of wrestling when one gritty glamorous woman rose through the ranks to take her place in athletic history Jeff Leen has made a fabulous contribution to the sports history canon The ueen of the Ring is a marvelous evocation of an era and a riveting portrait of a one of a kind American moll Sally Jenkins author of The Real All Americans A wealth of research went into this and it is a huge success I usually read boxing bios and stumbled across this one The era and personalities come to life Often these books lack depth and just ham things up This one is a very level and considered piece I'm not really a wrestling fan but enjoyed it for the social history as well as the amazing life story Well worth the money